Past Lectures & visits We are following Government and National advice, updated daily, on the best way to cope with the Covid-19 issues for our meetings. At the moment our programme continues, but if the situation changes we will circulate details as soon as we are able. Thursday 22 October: Zoom Lecture: 11am Jacob van Ruisdael, Master of Landscape Jane Choy Thurlow One of the most important contributions that Dutch 17th century artists made to art is the development of the landscape. Edward Norgate, an English visitor to Holland in the 17 century wrote landscape is a word borrowed by us from the Dutch, fittingly enough because landscapes is their own child. Jacob van Ruisdael is considered the greatest 17th century Dutch landscape artist. He looked at his contemporary environment but he also used his imagination to create dramatic scenes producing some of the most astounding landscape art works ever produced. His work influenced later artists. ‘It haunts my mind and clings to my heart’ wrote the English landscape artist John Constable after viewing a work by Jacob van Ruisdael. Thursday 24 September: Zoom Lecture: 11am Thomas Heatherwick, the last Leonardo? Ian Swankie The past decade has seen the meteoric rise of this extraordinarily versatile British designer with his acclaimed Olympic cauldron, the iconic new London bus and designs for a spectacular new HQ building for Google. Over the last twenty years the Heatherwick Studio has used an intriguing combination of curiosity and experimentation to produce a vast range of solutions to design challenges around the world. This talk looks at the problems presented, and the wonderfully creative ways in which Heatherwick and his team have responded. Tuesday 8 September: Zoom Lecture: 11am Go Crystal Tears; The Art of Melancholy Adam Busiakiewicz (the Lutist we love). An invite from Stamford Society. Despite our own modern preconceptions, the quiet introspection of melancholy was often associated with creativity in the past. This was prevalent in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, when significant treatises, music and art were dedicated to this condition. Treading the thin line between madness and contentment, this lecture will investigate why and how artists of painting and music responded to this significant part of human consciousness. (Several pieces of live lute music will be performed as part of the lecture.) 27 August 2020 11.00 am Sophie Matthews Music in Art Sophie Matthews began playing flute at the age of ten but is now more well-known for her prowess on the English border bagpipes and has become one of the foremost players of the instrument in the UK. She also plays a variety of early woodwind instruments such as shawm, rauschpfeife and recorder. She is one of a handful of British players of the baroque musette, an 18th century French bagpipe similar to the Northumbrian smallpipes. Sophie is also recognised as a superb interpreter of narrative song with a clear, pure and unaffected soprano voice. When not touring with modern-day balladeers GreenMatthews, Sophie makes instruments (she made her own baroque oboe) and works with respected luthier Tony Millyard on his flutes. She’s previously worked with The Oxford Waits as well as the respected early music collective Piva. Sophie is self-taught on all of her instruments. About the presentation: Historical musician and instrument maker Sophie Matthews explores the links between the visual and the aural in this one-hour presentation. Drawing on the works of great painters such as Brueghel, Hogarth and Bosch, Sophie presents a variety of images of historical woodwind instruments in their original social context. The symbolism of music in mediaeval and Renaissance arts is also explored, along with live performances of historical music upon authentic instruments. 23 July 11 am on Zoom Briony Hudson In paynted pots is hidden the deadliest poyson Blue and white tin-glazed earthenware has long been admired and collected for its attractive appearance, but this lecture goes further by examining English delftware with a pharmaceutical purpose. Drawing on examples from collections at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, the Royal College of Physicians and the Royal College of Surgeons of England, this talk will provide a beginner's guide to these beautiful yet practical vessels. By placing them in their wider historical context, Briony will also demonstrate that delftware drug jars have an undervalued role to play in understanding medical practices in the 17th and 18th centuries. Briony Hudson studied History at Cambridge University, and Museums Studies at Leicester University. She has worked at museums as diverse as Hereford Cider Museum, the V&A, and Wakefield Museum, and was Keeper of the Museum Collections at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society from 2002 to 2010. Among her publications are works on English Delftware Drug Jars: The collection of the Museum of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society and Jacob Bell: a useful and honourable life. Briony is Past President of the British Society for the History of Pharmacy, and gives lectures on a wide range of topics relating to pharmacy history. Photo courtesy of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society Museum 27 February 2020 Joanna Banham Walter Crane and Nursery Wallpapers Due to unforeseen circumstances on the day, the Walter Crane lecture was replaced by a lecture on William Morris. 23 January 2020 Jonathan Foyle Peterborough Cathedral Peterborough Cathedral started life as a seventh-century abbey, and became a cathedral under Henry VIII. Once called ‘Golden Borough’, the Saxon abbey’s wealth was plundered after the Norman Conquest, but the church arose again with architecture of great power culminating in its unmistakable triple-arched west front. The speaker, author of a recent book on this great building, will outline the development of the building and focus on presenting the first analysis of the hidden meaning in its magnificent thirteenth-century nave ceiling, which emerges as the greatest political work of art in the age of Magna Carta. Click here for the web site for Peterborough Cathedral 12 December 2019 Last Supper in Pompeii Visit to the Ashmolean Museum This major exhibition tells the story of this ancient Roman town’s love affair with food. See below three photos from the trip ‘Last Supper in Pompeii’ Members and guests of Oakham Arts Society enjoyed a guided tour of this stunning exhibition at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford in early December 2019. These few pictures show our group and just some of the detailed artworks and articles still being revealed in excavations at Pompeii.
Web site designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training.
Web site designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training.
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