Web site designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training.
Lectures Thursday 26 August This lecture will be live at Greetham Valley Golf Club, in the Rutland Suite, for Oakham members and their guests only. With the help of the lecturer we will simultaneously Zoom it to those Oakham members unable to attend. We are hoping that many of you will stay for a light lunch after the lecture. GVGC will help us ensure that we are Covid compliant for this too. So please find below the lunch application form. It will wonderful to meet you again in person after all these months of remote and virtual contact. And bring a friend too. TASO SUMMER LUNCH APPLICATION FORM 26 August 2021 11am Live and on Zoom BEAUTY IN TRUTH—the past, present, and future of botanical illustration Timothy Walker Many people now carry a phone with a camera capable of taking very high- quality pictures, and yet the painting of botanical specimens persists with new Florilegium Societies still being formed. Why is a drawing and painting still considered to be superior to a digital image? This talk looks at the history of botanical illustration from the early herbals 2,000 years ago to the present day, taking in the lives of both the artists and the plants immortalised in the artwork. The chapters in the lecture are thus: 1. Potentially this is very long story – using the lens of Oxford connections and euphorbias 2. Botanical Art: is this an oxymoron? 3. Botanical Illustration - the many different techniques and materials 4. Illustrations supporting botany – what is the use of botanical illustrations 5. Theophrastus to 1600 – mostly herbals 6. 1600 – 1770: Morison, Grew, Linnaeus, & Ehret 7. 1770 – 1840: Joseph Banks, & the Bauer Brothers, Franz & Ferdinand 8. 19th century – the Hookers of Kew 9. 20th century – mostly women 10. 21st century – what next? Photographs, digital possibilities These are 5 quotations that I start with. “Nothing can be beautiful which is not true” John Ruskin “In the best illustrations, the artistic aspect is not lessened by the scientific purpose” Martin Rix “Art is the flower - Life is the green leaf” Charles Rennie Mackintosh “If you can draw a leaf, you can draw everything” John Ruskin “There is beauty in truth” Wilfrid Blunt Hopefully back at Victoria Hall for the September and future meetings, but obviously this could change. Please keep checking back with the web site for the latest information. 23 September 2021 11am (hopefully back at Victoria Hall for this meeting) The Sunflower in Art and Culture Dr Twigs Way A fascinating talk exploring the many depictions, myths and cultural roles of that most glorious of plants, the sunflower. Tracing its origins from South America, its association with the god Apollo, to its role in art as personification of kings starring in depictions by artists from van Dyck to van Gogh. Worshipped by the aesthetes and arts and crafts movements it found favour in the gardens of the Impressionists, and led a touch of magic to the humbler cottage garden. From Clytie to Klimt this is the extraordinary tale of an extraordinary plant. Photo: George Chernilevsky 28 October 2021 11am (hopefully back at Victoria Hall for this meeting) The Hazards of the Journey, Travel in the Middle Ages Imogen Corrigan What possessed people to trudge hundreds of miles, often in appalling conditions and sometimes perishing on the way? This lecture considers this question and also how there was a shift from spiritual wandering in the AngloSaxon period to religious tourism in the days of Chaucer’s pilgrims. It also looks closely at travel in general and the hazards of the journey: how did people organise themselves for long journeys and how safe was it? How should they provide for themselves and where might they find help? From maps and motivation to souvenirs and shrines, this lecture discusses travel in the round as well as specifically for spiritual reasons. 25 November 2021 11 am (hopefully back at Victoria Hall for this meeting) Image and History: Art at the Lansdowne Club Pamela Campbell-Johnston The current art collection at the Lansdowne Club highlights the fascinating architectural, social and political history of Lansdowne House, now home to this private members' Club. Through 18th century prints, oils, photography, modern silkscreens, lithographs and mixed media works, the image and history of this Grade II building comes to life. Located in Mayfair, central London, the internal fabric of this important building beautifully fuses 18th century neo-classical architecture with the highly fashionable Art Deco style and serves as an eye-catching home for the current modern British art collection. The talk will examine the original floor plan as designed by the celebrated Scottish architect, Robert Adam and the changes thereafter by renowned architects George Dance the Younger, Sir Robert Smirke and TH Wyatt. This fully illustrated presentation will also highlight key works in the modern British art collection by artists such as Nigel Bengstrom, Jennifer Dickson RA, Michelle McKinney and Richard Heep, demonstrating how current commissions and acquisitions can complement the heritage of this historic building. As former home to a past British Prime Minister, Lord Shelburne (1st Marquis of Lansdowne) and to Harry Gordon Selfridge, the department store magnate, Members will also be regaled with stories of intrigue and passion as reflected in the art collection.
Lectures 2021 Membership Year Thursday 26 August This lecture will be live at Greetham Valley Golf Club, in the Rutland Suite, for Oakham members and their guests only. With the help of the lecturer we will simultaneously Zoom it to those Oakham members unable to attend. We are hoping that many of you will stay for a light lunch after the lecture. GVGC will help us ensure that we are Covid compliant for this too. So please find below the lunch application form. It will wonderful to meet you again in person after all these months of remote and virtual contact. And bring a friend too. TASO SUMMER LUNCH APPLICATION FORM 26 August 2021 11am Live and on Zoom BEAUTY IN TRUTH—the past, present, and future of botanical illustration Timothy Walker Many people now carry a phone with a camera capable of taking very high-quality pictures, and yet the painting of botanical specimens persists with new Florilegium Societies still being formed. Why is a drawing and painting still considered to be superior to a digital image? This talk looks at the history of botanical illustration from the early herbals 2,000 years ago to the present day, taking in the lives of both the artists and the plants immortalised in the artwork. The chapters in the lecture are thus: 1. Potentially this is very long story – using the lens of Oxford connections and euphorbias 2. Botanical Art: is this an oxymoron? 3. Botanical Illustration - the many different techniques and materials 4. Illustrations supporting botany – what is the use of botanical illustrations 5. Theophrastus to 1600 – mostly herbals 6. 1600 – 1770: Morison, Grew, Linnaeus, & Ehret 7. 1770 – 1840: Joseph Banks, & the Bauer Brothers, Franz & Ferdinand 8. 19th century – the Hookers of Kew 9. 20th century – mostly women 10. 21st century – what next? Photographs, digital possibilities These are 5 quotations that I start with. “Nothing can be beautiful which is not true” John Ruskin “In the best illustrations, the artistic aspect is not lessened by the scientific purpose” Martin Rix “Art is the flower - Life is the green leaf” Charles Rennie Mackintosh “If you can draw a leaf, you can draw everything” John Ruskin “There is beauty in truth” Wilfrid Blunt Hopefully back at Victoria Hall for the September and future meetings, but obviously this could change. Please keep checking back with the web site for the latest information. 23 September 2021 11am (hopefully back at Victoria Hall for this meeting) The Sunflower in Art and Culture Dr Twigs Way A fascinating talk exploring the many depictions, myths and cultural roles of that most glorious of plants, the sunflower. Tracing its origins from South America, its association with the god Apollo, to its role in art as personification of kings starring in depictions by artists from van Dyck to van Gogh. Worshipped by the aesthetes and arts and crafts movements it found favour in the gardens of the Impressionists, and led a touch of magic to the humbler cottage garden. From Clytie to Klimt this is the extraordinary tale of an extraordinary plant. Photo: George Chernilevsky 28 October 2021 11am (hopefully back at Victoria Hall for this meeting) The Hazards of the Journey, Travel in the Middle Ages Imogen Corrigan What possessed people to trudge hundreds of miles, often in appalling conditions and sometimes perishing on the way? This lecture considers this question and also how there was a shift from spiritual wandering in the AngloSaxon period to religious tourism in the days of Chaucer’s pilgrims. It also looks closely at travel in general and the hazards of the journey: how did people organise themselves for long journeys and how safe was it? How should they provide for themselves and where might they find help? From maps and motivation to souvenirs and shrines, this lecture discusses travel in the round as well as specifically for spiritual reasons. 25 November 2021 11 am (hopefully back at Victoria Hall for this meeting) Image and History: Art at the Lansdowne Club Pamela Campbell-Johnston The current art collection at the Lansdowne Club highlights the fascinating architectural, social and political history of Lansdowne House, now home to this private members' Club. Through 18th century prints, oils, photography, modern silkscreens, lithographs and mixed media works, the image and history of this Grade II building comes to life. Located in Mayfair, central London, the internal fabric of this important building beautifully fuses 18th century neo-classical architecture with the highly fashionable Art Deco style and serves as an eye- catching home for the current modern British art collection. The talk will examine the original floor plan as designed by the celebrated Scottish architect, Robert Adam and the changes thereafter by renowned architects George Dance the Younger, Sir Robert Smirke and TH Wyatt. This fully illustrated presentation will also highlight key works in the modern British art collection by artists such as Nigel Bengstrom, Jennifer Dickson RA, Michelle McKinney and Richard Heep, demonstrating how current commissions and acquisitions can complement the heritage of this historic building. As former home to a past British Prime Minister, Lord Shelburne (1st Marquis of Lansdowne) and to Harry Gordon Selfridge, the department store magnate, Members will also be regaled with stories of intrigue and passion as reflected in the art collection.
Web site designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training.